The National Assembly taking the Tennis Court Oath (sketch by Jacques-Louis David).
The Third Estate declared themselves the National Assembly, an assembly not of the Estates but of “the People.” They invited the other orders to join them, but made it clear they intended to conduct the nation’s affairs with or without them. Louis XVI ordered the closure of the Salle des États where the Assembly met,  so the Assembly moved their deliberations to a nearby indoor  tennis court, where they proceeded to swear the Tennis Court Oath (20 June 1789), under which they agreed not to separate until they had given France a constitution.

The National Assembly taking the Tennis Court Oath (sketch by Jacques-Louis David).

The Third Estate declared themselves the National Assembly, an assembly not of the Estates but of “the People.” They invited the other orders to join them, but made it clear they intended to conduct the nation’s affairs with or without them. Louis XVI ordered the closure of the Salle des États where the Assembly met,  so the Assembly moved their deliberations to a nearby indoor  tennis court, where they proceeded to swear the Tennis Court Oath (20 June 1789), under which they agreed not to separate until they had given France a constitution.

  1. historytchatchke posted this